05-01-2020- 5 charts on views of press freedom

05-01-2020- 5 charts on views of press freedom

05-01-2020- 5 charts on views of press freedom

MAY 1, 2020

5 charts on views of press freedom around the world

BY AIDAN CONNAUGHTON

Since the United Nations proclaimed May 3 World Press Freedom Day in 1993, the day has been used to celebrate the fundamental principles of media freedom, as well as to assess the state of this freedom and pay tribute to journalists who have lost their lives in the line of duty. To mark the day, here are five charts that show how people globally see the freedom of the press. All findings are taken from Pew Research Center surveys.

How we did this

1Majorities across Europe, North America and Latin America say it is very important to have freedom of the press, according to a 2019 survey of 34 countries. Support is highest in Greece, where 89% say it is very important that the media can report the news without government censorship. Majorities in many other countries – including Australia, Turkey, the Philippines, Ukraine, South Africa and Nigeria – say the same. Freedom of the press is considered very important by fewer than half of adults in South Korea, Japan, Israel, Indonesia, Russia, India, Tunisia and Lebanon.

Majorities in Europe, Americas say media freedom is very important

2Support for freedom of the press has increased since 2015 in several nations. The percentage who say it is very important that the media can report the news without state or government censorship has risen in 11 countries since 2015, including 19 percentage point increases in France, the UK and Turkey. The increases come amid a documented decline in media freedom around the world over the same period. (In addition to freedom of the press, support for freedom of speech rose in 10 countries over the same period.) Meanwhile, the percentage of people who say press freedom is very important declined between 2015 and 2019 in Germany, Italy, Russia and Brazil.

3Across many countries surveyed, people with more education are more likely to say media freedom is very important than those with less education. In 28 of 34 countries surveyed in 2019, there are significant differences between those with more education and those with less education. This difference is starkest in France and the Netherlands, where those with more schooling are 26 points more likely to say free media is very important. (This pattern is not unique to freedom of the press: In 27 of 34 countries surveyed, those with more education are also more likely to say it is very important to have censorship-free internet; in 20 countries, they are more likely to say it is very important that people can say what they want without state or government censorship. Across several countries, those with less education were more likely not to answer either question.) South Africa is the only country surveyed where those with less education are more likely to say free media is very important.

Those with more education are more likely to say free press is very important

4Western Europeans with populist views are less likely than non-populists to say the news media are very important to the functioning of their country’s society. This pattern appeared in seven of eight Western European countries surveyed by Pew Research Center in 2017 (the exception was Spain). The differences in views between populists and non-populists were even more pronounced than the differences between those who place themselves on the ideological left and right. In the Netherlands, for example, populists were 20 points less likely than non-populists to say the news media are very important to the functioning of society (35% vs. 55%). The left-right difference on this question was only 8 points.

Wide divides between those with populist views and those without over news media’s role in society

5Most people say news organizations in their country are doing well at reporting the news accurately, according to a 2017 survey of 38 countries. Ratings of the news media were measured, however: Across the nations surveyed, a median of just 26% said the news media were doing very well at reporting the news accurately. Ratings of the media were highest in sub-Saharan Africa and the Asia-Pacific region, where medians of 82% and 74%, respectively, said that the media were doing well at reporting the news accurately. Majorities in Greece and South Korea said the media were not doing well at reporting the news accurately.

Most say news media are doing a good job covering most important stories

Topics

State of the News MediaFree SpeechForeign News

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Aidan Connaughton  is a research assistant focusing on global attitudes research at Pew Research Center.

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